Remembering the Society in your Will

A message from the President, Professor Mike Cruise

Over many years the Royal Astronomical Society has done an enormous amount to support Astronomy and Geophysics, through its publishing activities, the regular scientific monthly meetings, its increasing work in the field of education and outreach, and through its respected policy advice to government in the UK and further afield. Add to this its heritage responsibilities, represented by the library and the astronomical artefacts that it owns and it is clear that the Society is playing an important role in our science.

In difficult times, the RAS has worked hard to support the community directly through the 3-year research fellowships (the 'RAS Research Fellowships' and the 'Sir Norman Lockyer Fellowship') and conference/travel grants. It has also increased its activity contributing to the policy debates concerning future science funding after Brexit. Reflecting the interests of its many overseas Fellows, the Society works for the development of astronomy and geophysics globally and represents British interests in the International Astronomical Union and International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics (the latter in cooperation with other learned societies).

Our activities are funded from membership fees, publishing income, investment income and donations. We could do so much more with even a modest increase in our funding. I hope therefore that you might be in a position to help the Society which is so important in our community. Following the precedent set by my recent predecessors as President, I'd like to remind you that a very simple and effective way to do expand our activities is to remember the Society in your will. The Society is a charity and so any bequest is free of inheritance tax in the United Kingdom. Any donation, small or large, will have an impact. Your gift would find an immediate use and would help provide a better future for our young scientists.

I thank you in advance.

Prof. Mike Cruise
President, Royal Astronomical Society

May 2018